Lost Chord

Contact name:

Mrs Helena Muller

Telephone:

Tel: 01709 811160 or 0779 0649 305

Email:

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Website:

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Address:

The Wesley Centre
Blyth Road
Maltby
Rotherham
S66 8JD

    Last Modified: July 20, 2021

    Lost Chord

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    Group aims

    We are an innovative charity dedicated to improving the quality of life and wellbeing of those suffering with dementia using interactive musical stimuli to increase their general awareness and self esteem.

    We aim:
    * To improve the quality of life and general well being of those living with dementia.
    * To increase opportunities for cultural diversity in the arts by initiating a schedule of monthly, concerts in the Black and Asian Communities across Yorkshire.
    * To improve understanding of the impact of music on the brain and the importance of therapeutic music in the care of people with dementia by offering training sessions for carers & volunteers.
    * To invest in the creative talent of young musicians, giving them the opportunity of working in this environment, thereby, broadening their approach to their musical career

    Group activities

    Monthly interactive musical sessions for those struggling with dementia in residential homes and day centres in an attempt to stimulate responses from those who in the main part can’t walk, talk, feed themselves or communicate in any way.

    Regular monthly performances for people with dementia and their carers in the community at Alzheimer’s Memory Cafes and other Day Centres throughout South Yorkshire where they can interact with other people in the same situation thereby reducing the stigma and isolation experienced by people with dementia.

    ‘’ Feedback from attendees at the memory cafés is extremely positive and clients regularly describe the cafes and musical entertainment as their lifeline. You can visibly see the burden of caring lift off the shoulders of carers as they relax and enjoy musical entertainment. People can revert to being a couple once again rather than carer and person with dementia. To observe people who are withdrawn and isolated, come out of their shell and engage by singing and dancing is tangible, powerful and emotional for all to see.’’ Source Alzheimer’s Society.

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